Zooz 700 Series Z-Wave Plus 4-in-1 Sensor ZSE40 (Motion / Light / Temperature / Humidity)

(5 customer reviews)
BrandZOOZ
ColorWhite
Power SourceBattery Powered
Item Weight0.02 Pounds
Number of Batteries1 CR123A batteries required.
  • 4 SMART SENSORS IN 1: This compact device detects and reports motion, temperature, humidity, and light level to your smart home app. Compatible Z-Wave hub required, sold separately.
  • NEW 700 SERIES VERSION: The included CR123A battery makes the sensor lasts much longer than any previous version. Updated motion detection allows you to get even quicker activity reports. New Z-Wave chip for better performance.
  • CUSTOMIZE IT: Choose from 7 levels of motion sensitivity, adjust the motion clear delay time, and pick from 3 different LED indicator modes (your hub needs to support advanced parameter input).
  • SECURITY FIRST: This sensor is equipped with the latest S2 authenticated security and signal encryption. It’s Z-Wave Plus 2 certified to ensure it complies with the highest industry standards. Supports SmartStart inclusion with a unique identifying PIN and QR code.
  • WILL IT WORK WITH MY HUB? This sensor is NOT supported by Wink, Vivint, ADT Pulse, Qolsys, or other Z-Wave alarm panels. It will work great with open systems like Hubitat, HomeSeer, Home Assistant, and compatible with SmartThings Hub.
SKU: B01AKSO80O Category:
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Features and specification

Integration Supported smart home integration

Interface Smart device connectivity interface

Manufacturer Smart device manufacturer

Color Available colors

Item Package Quantity

‎1

Batteries Included?

Batteries Required?

Batteries Type of batteries used

Power Source

Model

‎4336302850

Item Weight

Frequently asked question

Does this also work as a z-wave range extender?

Battery operated devices, such as this, will not work as a range extender since the radio is off most of the time or turns on and off.

Can this be used outside?

I've been using mine outdoors. Mine is mounted high under the cover of the front porch and I use it to notify of outdoor activity and to turn on the outside lights at night when there is motion. This motion sensor is slow to respond, day or night, if it responds at all. I have the same issue with the other two that I u… see more I've been using mine outdoors. Mine is mounted high under the cover of the front porch and I use it to notify of outdoor activity and to turn on the outside lights at night when there is motion. This motion sensor is slow to respond, day or night, if it responds at all. I have the same issue with the other two that I use indoors in bathrooms.

How fast should humidity reflect reality? Took a shower 40 minutes ago, humidity is normal in bathroom now, and device just reported it is still 80%+.

Depending on the reporting threshold you have set for the sensor, it would change as fast as 3 minutes after the threshold is met. So if humidity threshold is left at the default 10%, it will need to decrease by 10% or more for the sensor to report the change. If it only changed by 9%, it won't be reported so if you're… see more Depending on the reporting threshold you have set for the sensor, it would change as fast as 3 minutes after the threshold is met. So if humidity threshold is left at the default 10%, it will need to decrease by 10% or more for the sensor to report the change. If it only changed by 9%, it won't be reported so if you're looking to monitor humidity closely, we recommend changing the reporting threshold for humidity to 2-3% for more frequent reports.

Does this work with Wink?

Wink does recognize some multisensors. I am running a Wink 2 hub and have connected some non-certified sensors, both ZigBee and ZWave. I have not tried these sensors. The Wink system is very simple and I have replaced my Casa Verde with the Wink (I was using both and Casa Verde had a plug in that worked with the WInk h… see more Wink does recognize some multisensors. I am running a Wink 2 hub and have connected some non-certified sensors, both ZigBee and ZWave. I have not tried these sensors. The Wink system is very simple and I have replaced my Casa Verde with the Wink (I was using both and Casa Verde had a plug in that worked with the WInk hub as well.

5 reviews for Zooz 700 Series Z-Wave Plus 4-in-1 Sensor ZSE40 (Motion / Light / Temperature / Humidity)

Quality

80 %

Price

80 %

Functionality

80 %

Reviewed by 0 customer(s)

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  • Anonymous

    No Lux only a percentage of light.

    Really nice sensor except the light meter. This device does not show Lux but instead uses a percentage of light. Percentage of what? How many lumens is 100% Who knows! Pretty stupid if you ask me.
    I have bought 5 of these long before I tried doing Lux automation and failed miserably.
    If you are looking for something to use with Lux automation do not choose this device.

    10/17/2022
    Verified Purchase

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  • Anonymous

    Battery lasts almost literally forever

    I got this in July 2019 to attach to a Hubitat system. I was very wary because ‘oh no, a battery powered device, this will be comedy…’
    It wasn’t. Battery just died. 3 YEARS later. It’s been in constant service the entire time.
    That’s impressive…
    As it is wireless, and as wireless devices have a sleep time associated with them (to save the aforementioned battery), it can lag a bit before picking up motion. A few seconds. Given the insanely good battery life I may attempt to shorten the sleep cycle time, but if you have multiple of these in a house, one of them’s going to hit quickly I think. I’ll have to try having more than one of them.
    I was considering eventually getting a wired system like a Honeywell, not really sure I’m considering that anymore given how well this has performed.

    10/04/2022
    Verified Purchase

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  • Anonymous

    Zooz ZSE40 'eats batteries'? Here's the explanation

    I have some information that I believe will explain why some people, if not all, are having issues with battery life from the ZSE40 4-in-1 sensor.
    First, let’s talk about what “battery life” means. Is it the time until you see your controller displays “0% battery capacity” (or something like that), or is it the length of time you actually got from a set of batteries before the sensor just stopped reporting anything back to the controller app? It turns out, they are two entirely different matters.
    I ran a simple experiment where I substituted an inexpensive lab power supply for the batteries in the ZSE40, and then varied the voltage to the battery terminals while observing what my controller app (Indigo 7.0.3 running on a Mac) displayed as “Battery Level.” (Your controller may call it a different name, but the idea is the same: an attempt to tell you, the user, how much juice is left in your batteries.) The results of my measurement were quite surprising.
    This comments section is not intended for any kind of technical discussion. If I got into electronic terms, most would not understand it and rightly ignore it. I must condense my findings into something simple. But one thing you need to know is how to gauge the health of an alkaline battery. You can do this by measuring its ‘voltage’ using a simple meter. A fresh alkaline will have a battery voltage of between 1.5 to 1.6 volts. As the battery discharges, its voltage will slowly decrease. A half-discharged battery measures about 1.25 volts. When the battery is fully discharged, its voltage will measure about 1.0 volts (some might prefer 1.1 volts). These numbers are approximations, but are reasonably accurate.
    Next, you must understand how a controller app determines the state of the battery of the ZSE40. It is NOT the app that does the measurement. It is the ZSE40 itself. It reads the batteries’ voltage, computes “something,” and then spits back a value between 0 to 100 to the app that specifies the batteries’ health, as a percentage. This is the number that you all read. From my above description of an alkaline battery’s state of health as measured by voltage, you would think that 100% would translate to a voltage of 1.5 to 1.6 volts, and that 0% would translate to a voltage of about 1.0 to 1.1 volts. You would THINK that, wouldn’t you?
    Think again. For whatever reason, the hardware and/or firmware in the ZSE40 considers a battery voltage of 1.3 volts to be at 0%. As in “dead battery.” I’m here to tell all of you that an alkaline battery with 1.3 volts across it is quite healthy, having about 60-80% of its capacity still remaining. Yet, the Zooz ZSE40 translates any voltage of 1.3 volts or less as 0% remaining capacity. The sensor tells you to throw away your batteries when they in fact they are still very healthy, and commenters respond with “eats batteries!’ You will notice that even though the controller app says your batteries are exhausted, the sensor still continues to work just fine. It only confirms that there is still a lot of gas left in their little tanks, despite what the gauge says! Once you see ‘0% capacity remaining,’ you have no idea if your batteries have 80% capacity remaining or 1% remaining. You’re flying blind at this point.
    A last point to be made is that the sensor ceases working when the battery voltage drops to 1.1 volts per cell. This shutoff leaves a bit more battery energy on the table, so it is a bit wasteful, too.
    This, folks, is why many of you observe short battery life. It is not the fault of the app, it is not a coding error in your app, it is the fault of the ZSE40 sensor for reporting this erroneous number to the app. The app writers can only report the information that the sensor gives it, even if it is wrong. And it is.
    I give it two stars because while the fuel gauge is thoroughly messed up, the sensors themselves are decent. Zooz should either update the firmware (mine is 16.09, BTW) or should not be shipping a product so flawed.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++
    For those of you who want a bit more detail, here is how the sensor converts battery voltage (I’ll call it Vbatt) and Capacity remaining (I’ll call it CR, expressed in percent) as the ZSE40 passes it to your controller:
    CR = (Vbatt – 1.3) * 500 (in percent)
    or conversely
    Vbatt = (.002 * CR) + 1.3 (in volts, for 1.3V ≤ Vbatt ≤ 1.5V)
    So 1.50V or higher reads as 100%, 1.46V reads as 80%, 1.42V reads as 60%, 1.38V reads as 40%, 1.34V reads as 20%, and 1.30V or less reads as 0%. If you understand anything about alkaline batteries, you know that these numbers are complete nonsense, as they paint just about any alkaline as far, far weaker than it really is.

    08/16/2022
    Verified Purchase

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  • Anonymous

    Works great, but be advised of a couple of details...

    This is a great little device and setup was super easy right out of the box… Mounting is easy and operation a cinch. Pairs effortlessly with SmartThings hub and includes all advertised functions, Temp, Humidity, Light, and Motion. Seems to perform well on all points. Temperature appears to be accurate (down to the decimal) and was very close to my standard in-home thermostat display. Humidity also seems to be accurate. Light detection is something I haven’t really used before and wasn’t the reason I purchased this device, but I am now very glad it is included because I’m finding it quite useful.
    My 86 year old mother has dementia and so we use smart tech throughout the house to keep an eye on things at night to make sure she’s safe and has plenty of convenience. Aside from cameras in operation, we use motion, door, and switches paired with Alexa to keep us alerted throughout the night if mom happens to get up and decide to take herself for a walk or just to let us hear and see her if she needs help. Motion sensors are obviously great for automatically turning on and off lights for her to make sure she can see well and won’t stumble. This was the first time I had employed the use of a light sensor. Now, when the lumens change beyond a certain level, a notification is sent to my phone to let me know that mom has turned on her light (or turned it off) in the middle of the night. The motion sensor (which I mounted closer to the floor) lets me know if she is up, out of bed and walking around or toward her bedroom door. The humidity sensor detects if the level drops below 30% and then turns on a switch that starts up the humidifier (as she is prone to nose bleeds so this keeps her room humid) and it turns off the humidifier if it passes a threshold. Since her room is on the far end of the house, it gets much cooler in there at night, so the temp sensor prompts another switch to turn on a space heater to warm things up to an appropriate level (and all of these actions are reported with notification as well). All of this is managed easily by this one device. So far, it’s working well and I’m happy!
    So, why not 5 stars? Well, there are a couple of small details that I wish could be resolved. One is that the device flashes red (ever so briefly) whenever motion is detected. It’s not overwhelming, but there should be a way to deactivate this effect. Mom doesn’t understand the tech and see the device flash at night and wonders what is going on. I wish I could disable it. Other motion smart devices I’ve used give the option in settings to disable the flash. This would be a welcome upgrade. So far though, it hasn’t proved to be a big problem.
    The other slight annoyance is that the update interval for humidity and temperature is not very frequent. To be fair, I have seen devices that are much worse… I haven’t timed it exactly, but it’s probably somewhere between 3 and 5 minutes between detection. That is a lot when the room is either too cold or hot or humid and you’re waiting for a device to adjust temperature. Still, the device is working well and consistently so far, so this is not a major complaint.
    Another disappointment I have is with the Alexa integration. Alexa finds the device no problem, but only works with motion detection. Not sure if this challenge is on Alexa’s end or on the device manufacturer’s end.
    Unfortunately, I cannot setup any routines (yet) in the Alexa app to give audible notification or actions based on humidity, temperature, or light sensing which is a bummer. I tried to get around this by creating virtual switches in SmartThings and using IFTTT, but no luck. While Alexa recognized the virtual switches, it will not allow you to use virtual switches to control routines. My hope was to create an audible alert when mom turns on her room light in the middle of the night. Oh well… At least I was able to have SmartThings send an automated text message with the alert.
    Shortcomings aside, I am NOT disappointed with this device. It works very well and very fast overall. I can heartily recommend it to everyone seeking a decent all-in-one sensor.

    08/09/2022
    Verified Purchase

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  • Anonymous

    Great little sensor!

    I’ve been using this sensor for about 6 months now. Getting it to connect to my Z-Wave network was not too bad
    The sensor works exactly as I was expect. You will need to adjust the offsets
    I was easily able to adopt this into my home assistant
    My only real complaint would be the mounting adhesive that comes with. It wasn’t very strong but I wouldn’t recommend using adhesive anyway

    07/26/2022
    Verified Purchase

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